Category: Industry


Developing Innovative Products

February 7, 2019

Industry

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Phase 0: Feasibility Analysis

The goal of this phase is to identify existing technology to achieve the intended high-level function. If technology can be purchased as opposed to developed, the scope of subsequent development phases changes.

Simply put, product development companies research and assess the probability that the current technology can be used to reach the intended functionality of the product. By doing this, the development efforts are reduced, which in financial terms represent a great reduction in development costs.

Moreover, if the technology is not yet available, then the assessment can result in longer development cycles and the focus moves into creating the new technology (if humanly possible) that can accomplish the functionality of the product.

This is an important part of the in any product development process because it is safer and financially responsible to understand the constraints that a product can have prior to starting a full development cycle. A feasibility study can cost between 7 -15 thousand dollars. It might be sound very expensive for some, but when it is much better than investing $100k+ to end up with a product that no manufacturer is able to produce.

Phase 1: Specification or PRD (Product Requirements Document) development

If your product is feasible, congratulations! you are a step closer to creating your product and you can move into documenting what is going to go into the product itself, aka the guts (product objective, core components, intended end-user, aesthetics, User interphase, etc).

In this phase, product design and engineering focus on documenting the critical functionality, constraints, and inputs to the design. This is a critical step to keep development focused, identify the high-risk areas, and ensure that scope creep is minimized later.

This document will help you communicate the key features of your product and how they are supposed to work to all members of your team. This will ensure that you keep everyone involved on the same page.

Without one, you are more likely to stay off track and miss deadlines. think about the PRD as your project management breakdown structure (BDS)

Phase 2: Concept Development

Initial shape development work identifies options for form, as well as possible approaches for complex mechanical engineering challenges. Initial flowchart of software/firmware also happens here, as well as concept design level user interface work. Aesthetic prototypes may be included in this Phase, if appropriate. Prototype in this phase will not typically be functional.

Phase 3: Initial Design and Engineering

Based on decisions made at the end a concept development phase, actual product design and engineering programming can start. In this phase, Level 1 prototypes are often used to test approaches to technical challenges.

Phase 4: Design Iteration

This part of the project is where we focus on rapid cycles, quickly developing designs and prototypes, as the depth of engineering work increases. This phase can include Level 2 and 3 prototypes, typically through multiple cycles. Some products require as many as twenty prototype cycles in this phase. Others may only require two or three.

Phase 5: Design Finalization / Optimization

With all assumptions tested and validated, the design can be finalized and then optimized for production. To properly optimize for production, product design and engineering teams take into account the target production volumes, as well as the requirements of the manufacturer. Regulatory work may start in this phase.

Phase 6: Manufacturing Start and Support

Before production starts, tooling is produced, and initial units are inspected. Final changes are negotiated with the manufacturer. Regulatory work also should wrap up in this phase.

Tips to Choose the Right Welding Machine


If you are a DIY enthusiast, you may need a good welding machine. You can find different types of welding machines. Some are cheap and some are expensive. For aspiring welders, it’s a good idea to find out more about different types of welding machines. Given below are a few tips that can help you opt for the right equipment.

1. Consider the Type of Metal

Typically, the welding job is done on carbon steel. Actually, carbon steel can withstand a lot of heat. Therefore, it supports most of the welding machines you can find in the market.

Since stainless steel can resist corrosion, it’s a good choice for the storage of edible items or beverages. Moreover, it supports MIG and TIG machines as well. Aside from this, it doesn’t consume a lot of power.

Aluminum requires consistent heat in order to ensure that the weld pool doesn’t dry out. Moreover, the amount of heat leads to the deformation of the piece. So, you need a complex welder in order to work on aluminum. This type of equipment allows you to do pulse welding.

It’s a good idea to make an assessment of the metal that you want to conjoin prior to opting for a machine.

2. Choose the Right Amperage

The price of the equipment depends upon the amount of power it can produce. You need more current to work on thicker metals. So, before you make a choice, don’t forget to consider your needs.

For instance, if you need to work on a pipe or steel that has 1-inch or higher thickness, you need a stick welding machine.

For tin metals, you need a machine that is more sensitive. You need the right amount of heat to do your work

3. Opt for an Ideal Site

The workplace is also an important factor to keep in mind when opting for a welder. For instance, domestic facilities have 115 or 220 volts power supply. So, you may want to get a welder that works on either 115 or 220 volts. Some powerful welders require a three-phase power supply. So, you may want to keep this in mind.

4. Check the Specs Sheet

Don’t forget to read the specs sheet. It will help you know a lot of important things that will help you make the right choice. For instance, by reading the specs sheet, you can find out how much work a welder can do in a given time period.

Duty cycle refers to the number of minutes that a machine can weld. If you keep working even after the given time is over, you may risk damaging your machine due to overheating.

5. Compressed-Gas Requirements

Lastly, you need to consider the type of compressed gas as well. Common names include carbon dioxide, argon, and oxygen. Based on your requirements, you should opt for the right type of compressed gas.